Board approves Arboretum Foundation funding request

During their July 9 meeting, the HPWD Board of Directors approved Lubbock Memorial Arboretum's request for $12,674.71 in funding to create a garden.to educate the public about the "beauty and utility of using water wise, well-adapted and native plants in landscapes of the South Plains region."

This 0.24 acre demonstration garden will be located at the Lubbock Memorial Arboretum, 4111 University Avenue.

This funding request was emailed to HPWD by the May 6, 2019 deadline. However, it was lost and not included in the group of proposals considered by the District's Research and Demonstration Funding Committee.

Chairman Mike Beauchamp asked that the request be placed on the Board Meeting agenda for discussion and consideration by the Board of Directors.

In other business, the Board:

  • Approved the Consent Agenda (Minutes, Financial Statement, and Bills)

  • Approved applications for water well permits received in June 2019.

  • Held preliminary discussion on the proposed Fiscal Year 2020 budget for operation and maintenance of HPWD.

  • Selected an auditor for Fiscal Year 2019.

  • Approved a new employee health benefit option.

The next HPWD Board of Directors meeting is Tuesday, August 13, at 1:30 p.m. at the District office in Lubbock. All agendas and past meeting minutes are available at hpwd.org/agendas.

July Is Smart Irrigation Month

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July is typically the month when the most water is used for landscape irrigation. This can account for 50 to 80 percent of the water used in a home during summer months. Much of this is often wasted through selection of improper plant materials and/or inefficient landscape watering practices -- including runoff.

As a result, the Irrigation Association (IA) has named July Smart Irrigation Month to draw attention to use of efficient irrigation technologies and practices.

The High Plains Water District (HPWD) is celebrating this month by sharing tips to help homeowners reduce the amount of water used outdoors.

You can save water in your landscape by implementing some of these practices:

  • Conduct an annual irrigation audit to make sure your system is working efficiently.

  • Replace water-intensive plants with drought-tolerant or native varieties.

  • Use smart technologies to help manage water use. Rain sensors, soil moisture probes, and smart controllers can help you with water management decisions.

  • Water deeply and less frequently to make your turf more resistant to drought and/or foot traffic.

  • Install a rainwater harvesting system to offset your use of groundwater or municipal water supplies.

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Smart Irrigation Month is not just for homeowners. The Irrigation Association also has some helpful tips for agricultural producers.

  • Take advantage of cost-share programs, such as the USDA-NRCS Environmental Quality Incentives Program (EQIP).

  • Minimize irrigation water runoff (“tailwater”) from fields.

  • Use telemetry equipment to improve irrigation scheduling.

  • Improve soil management to improve water infiltration and reduce runoff.

“It is important to make sure irrigation systems are properly operated and maintained,” says High Plains Water District Manager Jason Coleman.  “This not only saves money—but it can help reduce waste of the region’s surface water and groundwater resources.  The High Plains Water District encourages persons to use water wisely without waste each day,” he says.

Additional information about Smart Irrigation Month is available at the Irrigation Association’s website (irrigation.org)